Fjallraven Vidda Pro Trousers Review

Fjallraven Vidda Pro trousers - Vidda Pro pants

The Fjallraven Vidda Pro trousers are a surprising pair of pants. The first surprise came when I tried them on and realized they’re much lighter than they appear. The second came when my wife said the trousers make me look like a soldier or SWAT Team agent. (I may have actually sprouted a few extra chest hairs and let out a grunt at hearing that.) But the third and most important surprise came after testing them on four separate hikes and two camping trips in Mt. Hood National Forest and realizing they had become my go-to pants.

Truth be told, I love these trousers. And not just because they’re really, truly called “trousers.”

Fjallraven doesn’t believe in “cheap.” That applies whether you’re talking about the price (inexpensive) or quality (not durable) definition of the word. There’s no “garbage in, garbage out” with them. Their products are a bit expensive but always built to last.

Looking at the Vidda Pro trousers, one could easily think they’re built to survive a war. That was actually the impetus for my wife’s military comment. Between the super-durable G-1000 fabric, the reinforced knees and rear, the six pockets, and the use of elastic straps with snap buttons to adjust the ankles, the Vidda Pro trousers look like something out of a Rambo film.

They hold up that well too. Similar to my sensation in the Kyl Parka, I feel virtually indestructible in the Vidda Pro trousers. Whether scrambling over logs, pushing aggressively through underbrush or forging through the forest sans trail, I never experienced a scratch on my leg or a scuff on the fabric. And because the G-1000 repels water, I even took them out kayaking and didn’t think twice. I just pushed the pant legs above my kneecaps, cramped down the adjustable straps, snapped them in place and waded into the water to get the boat going. Any incidental splashes just beaded up and ran right off.

In spite of their appearance, the Vidda Pro trousers are surprisingly lightweight and comfortable. Grab them off the shelf, and it looks like you’re about to cover your legs in rigid canvas. Yes, they’re thicker and a bit less fluid than other pants I’ve tested this summer from Mountain Khakis and Cotopaxi. But for all that bulky appearance, all those reinforced areas and all those extra pockets, they never feel clunky like Army fatigues. In fact, they’re no heavier than my everyday jeans, and they’re just as comfortable.

The Vidda Pro trousers are also surprisingly breathable. I say “surprisingly” because the fabric seems thick and offers a decent amount of windproofing. This breathability is augmented by the knee-reinforcing layer being open at the bottom for added ventilation. The fabric doesn’t actually open or allow you to reach through and touch skin. But it does allow extra air to flow between the two layers of G-1000, keeping your knees from overheating in all but the warmest conditions. For context, I hiked in 82-degree weather wearing the Vidda Pro trousers and was just fine. Yes, I get cold easily, but still….

These aren’t rock-climbing pants. They’re not jogging pants. They’re tough pants that you can camp in, hike in and explore in without fear. Durable, comfortable and functional, the Vidda Pro trousers are the best outdoor pants I’ve owned in more than a decades.

Fjallraven Vidda Pro Trousers

Fjallraven Vidda Pro Trousers
9.34

Design

10/10

    Warmth

    9/10

      Waterproofing

      9/10

        Breathability

        9/10

          Comfort

          10/10

            Pros

            • Durable enough to handle backcountry obstacles
            • Surprisingly lightweight and breathable for their appearance
            • Lots of large pockets
            • Adjustable ankles have snaps, which keeps things in place for miles
            • Very comfortable

            Cons

            • 32-inch inseam as a Regular length may be a bit long for some
            • Ummm... they show wrinkles?

            Jonas Allen

            Jonas spent 17 years covering travel, technology and entertainment for regional and international media. He now writes about gear, clothes and tips to stay warm. He hopes his lessons will help other people who get cold (re)discover the great outdoors.

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